Related Books:

Remembering the Kanji 1
Language: un
Pages: 484
Authors: James W. Heisig
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

Volume 2 (4th ed.) updated to include the 196 kanja approved in 2010 for general use.
Remembering the Kanji, Volume 1
Language: un
Pages: 460
Authors: James W. Heisig
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-01-01 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the
Remembering the Kanji
Language: un
Pages: 397
Authors: James W. Heisig
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-01-01 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

Following the first volume of Remembering the Kanji, the present work takes up the pronunciation of characters and provides students with helpful tools for memorizing them. Behind the notorious inconsistencies in the way the Japanese language has come to pronounce the characters it received from China lie several coherent patterns.
Remembering the Kanji
Language: un
Pages: 405
Authors: James W. Heisig
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher:

This book focuses on the pronunciation and reading of the Kanji presented in Remembering the Kanji V. 1. The Kanji in this volume are organized into groups based on the building blocks of the characters to facilitate their study.
Remembering the Kana
Language: un
Pages: 160
Authors: James W. Heisig
Categories: Foreign Language Study
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-04-30 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

Following on the phenomenal success of Remembering the Kanji, the author has prepared a companion volume for learning the Hiragana and Katakana syllabaries of modern Japanese. In six short lessons of about twenty minutes, each of the two systems of "kana" writing are introduced in such a way that the