Simplicius On Aristotle Physics 3

But why is Aristotle's beginningless universe not temporally infinite? Simplicius answers that the past years no longer exist, so one never has an infinite collection.

Simplicius  On Aristotle Physics 3

Author: Simplicius,

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1780939000

Page: 240

View: 521

Aristotle's Physics Book 3 covers two subjects: the definition of change and the finitude of the universe. Change enters into the very definition of nature as an internal source of change. Change receives two definitions in chapters 1 and 2, as involving the actualisation of the potential or of the changeable. Alexander of Aphrodisias is reported as thinking that the second version is designed to show that Book 3, like Book 5, means to disqualify change in relations from being genuine change. Aristotle's successor Theophrastus, we are told, and Simplicius himself, prefer to admit relational change. Chapter 3 introduces a general causal principle that the activity of the agent causing change is in the patient undergoing change, and that the causing and undergoing are to be counted as only one activity, however different in definition. Simplicius points out that this paves the way for Aristotle's God who moves the heavens, while admitting no motion in himself. It is also the basis of Aristotle's doctrine, central to Neoplatonism, that intellect is one with the objects it contemplates.In defending Aristotle's claim that the universe is spatially finite, Simplicius has to meet Archytas' question, "What happens at the edge?". He replies that, given Aristotle's definition of place, there is nothing, rather than an empty place, beyond the furthest stars, and one cannot stretch one's hand into nothing, nor be prevented by nothing. But why is Aristotle's beginningless universe not temporally infinite? Simplicius answers that the past years no longer exist, so one never has an infinite collection.

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Simplicius: On Aristotle Physics 3
Language: un
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Authors: Simplicius,, Peter Lautner
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-04-10 - Publisher: A&C Black

Aristotle's Physics Book 3 covers two subjects: the definition of change and the finitude of the universe. Change enters into the very definition of nature as an internal source of change. Change receives two definitions in chapters 1 and 2, as involving the actualisation of the potential or of the
Philoponus on Aristotle Physics 3, 5-8 with Simplicius on Aristotle on the Void
Language: un
Pages:
Authors: John Philoponus, Aristotle
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher:

Books about Philoponus on Aristotle Physics 3, 5-8 with Simplicius on Aristotle on the Void
Simplicius: On Aristotle Physics 3
Language: un
Pages: 240
Authors: Simplicius, of Cilicia Simplicius, Peter Lautner
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-04-10 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Aristotle's "Physics Book 3" covers two subjects: the definition of change and the finitude of the universe. This text provides a translation of Simplicius' commentry on Aristotle's work, with notes by Peter Lautner.
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Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Simplicius, of Cilicia Simplicius, Peter Lautner
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-04-22 - Publisher: A&C Black

Simplicius' greatest contribution in his commentary on Aristotle on Physics 1.5-9 lies in his treatment of matter. The sixth-century philosopher starts with a valuable elucidation of what Aristotle means by 'principle' and 'element' in Physics. Simplicius' own conception of matter is of a quantity that is utterly diffuse because of
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Language: un
Pages: 218
Authors: Philoponus Johannes, John Philoponus
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 1994 - Publisher:

Book 3 of Aristotle's Physics elaborates definitions of change and infinity - concepts central to his theory of nature. In a sixth-century commentary on Physics 3, Philoponus makes use of Aristotle's views to argue for a Christian interpretation of infinity. In Physics Book 2, Aristotle defines nature as an internal