Supermarine Rolls Royce S6B Owners Workshop Manual

In Supermarine Rolls-Royce S6B Owners' Workshop Manual, Ralph Pegram relates the story of the Schneider Trophy competitions and describes the development of British high-speed seaplane designs.

Supermarine Rolls Royce S6B Owners  Workshop Manual

Author: Ralph Pegram

Publisher: Haynes Publishing UK

ISBN: 9781785212260

Page: 192

View: 881

On 13 September 1931 the Schneider Trophy was won outright for Britain on Southampton Water by Flt Lt John Boothman flying Supermarine S6B, S1595, with a record-breaking average speed of 379.08mph. In Supermarine Rolls-Royce S6B Owners' Workshop Manual, Ralph Pegram relates the story of the Schneider Trophy competitions and describes the development of British high-speed seaplane designs. He examines the anatomy of the S6B (including the Rolls-Royce R engine), as well as giving rare insights into its flying characteristics and how it was maintained, operated and – of course – raced in the final competition.

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On 13 September 1931 the Schneider Trophy was won outright for Britain on Southampton Water by Flt Lt John Boothman flying Supermarine S6B, S1595, with a record-breaking average speed of 379.08mph. In Supermarine Rolls-Royce S6B Owners' Workshop Manual, Ralph Pegram relates the story of the Schneider Trophy competitions and describes
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