Teaching the Struggle for Civil Rights 1948 1976

The pedagogical issues essays focus on common concerns and disputes that often surround the teaching of civil rights. Lesson plans and related resources addressing the topics highlighted by chapter authors are also included in the book.

Teaching the Struggle for Civil Rights  1948 1976

Author: Whitney Blankenship

Publisher:

ISBN: 9781433143663

Page: 216

View: 844

Teaching the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1948-1976 will provide readers with critical content knowledge of lesser known figures and events in the 20th century Civil Rights Movement. As the initial volume in the Teaching Critical Themes in American History series, the book will also fulfill the aim of the series, which is to provide teachers with history content, pedagogical strategies, and teaching resources organized around key themes in American history and critical topics on which they might want to concentrate. In Teaching the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1948-1976, traditional civil rights narratives are expanded through the use of an intersectional lens within historical analysis essays that provide additional context to the larger civil rights movements of the period. The pedagogical issues essays focus on common concerns and disputes that often surround the teaching of civil rights. Lesson plans and related resources addressing the topics highlighted by chapter authors are also included in the book. Social studies and history methods professors and curriculum coordinators will find the book helpful for introducing the teaching of civil rights movements. Pre-service and in-service educators can use the lesson plans and resources as models for their own units of study.

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