The Promise and Peril of Credit

Francesca Trivellato recounts how the invention of these abstruse credit contracts was falsely attributed to Jews, and how this story gave voice to deep-seated fears about the unseen perils of the new paper economy.

The Promise and Peril of Credit

Author: Francesca Trivellato

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691217386

Page: 424

View: 654

How an antisemitic legend gave voice to widespread fears surrounding the expansion of private credit in Western capitalism The Promise and Peril of Credit takes an incisive look at pivotal episodes in the West’s centuries-long struggle to define the place of private finance in the social and political order. It does so through the lens of a persistent legend about Jews and money that reflected the anxieties surrounding the rise of impersonal credit markets. By the close of the Middle Ages, new and sophisticated credit instruments made it easier for European merchants to move funds across the globe. Bills of exchange were by far the most arcane of these financial innovations. Intangible and written in a cryptic language, they fueled world trade but also lured naive investors into risky businesses. Francesca Trivellato recounts how the invention of these abstruse credit contracts was falsely attributed to Jews, and how this story gave voice to deep-seated fears about the unseen perils of the new paper economy. She locates the legend’s earliest version in a seventeenth-century handbook on maritime law and traces its legacy all the way to the work of the founders of modern social theory—from Marx to Weber and Sombart. Deftly weaving together economic, legal, social, cultural, and intellectual history, Trivellato vividly describes how Christian writers drew on the story to define and redefine what constituted the proper boundaries of credit in a modern world increasingly dominated by finance.

Related Books:

The Promise and Peril of Credit
Language: en
Pages: 424
Authors: Francesca Trivellato
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06 - Publisher: Princeton University Press

How an antisemitic legend gave voice to widespread fears surrounding the expansion of private credit in Western capitalism The Promise and Peril of Credit takes an incisive look at pivotal episodes in the West’s centuries-long struggle to define the place of private finance in the social and political order. It
The Promise and Perils of Writing Program Administration
Language: en
Pages: 372
Authors: Theresa Enos, Shane Borrowman
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-01-26 - Publisher: Parlor Press LLC

Combining formal quantitative research with narrative-based scholarship, THE PROMISE AND PERILS OF WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION represents multiple voices from faculty balancing between the demands of teaching, writing, and administering writing programs in professional, ethical ways-often under circumstances that can be defined, at best, as difficult. In these pages, junior faculty
The Fabric of Civilization
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Virginia Postrel
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-10 - Publisher: Hachette UK

From Paleolithic flax to 3D knitting, explore the global history of textiles and the world they weave together in this enthralling and educational guide. The story of humanity is the story of textiles -- as old as civilization itself. Since the first thread was spun, the need for textiles has
The Silo Effect
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Gillian Tett
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-09-27 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

An award-winning columnist and journalist describes how businesses that structure their teams into functional departments, or "silos," actually hinder work, cripple innovation, restrict thinking and force normally smart people to ignore risks and opportunities. --
The Reign of Anti-logos
Language: en
Pages: 275
Authors: David Hawkes
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-24 - Publisher: Springer Nature

The concept of ‘performativity’ has risen to prominence throughout the humanities. The rise of financial derivatives reflects the power of the performative sign in the economic sphere. As recent debates about gender identity show, the concept of performativity is also profoundly influential on people’s personal lives. Although the autonomous power