Theater of Anger

Theatre of Anger examines contemporary transnational theatre in Berlin through the political scope of anger, and its trajectory from Aristotle all the way to Audre Lorde and bell hooks.

Theater of Anger

Author: Olivia Landry

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1487507690

Page: 256

View: 135

Theatre of Anger examines contemporary transnational theatre in Berlin through the political scope of anger, and its trajectory from Aristotle all the way to Audre Lorde and bell hooks.

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